Schumann

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The Best of Schumann

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Robert Schumann (8 June 1810 – 29 July 1856) was a German composer, pianist, and influential music critic. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era. Schumann left the study of law, intending to pursue a career as a virtuoso pianist. His teacher, Friedrich Wieck, a German pianist, had assured him that he could become the finest pianist in Europe, but a hand injury ended this dream. Schumann then focused his musical energies on composing. In 1840, after a long and acrimonious legal battle with Wieck, who opposed the marriage, Schumann married Wieck's daughter Clara. Before their marriage, Clara—also a composer—had substantially supported her father through her considerable career as a pianist. Together, Clara and Robert encouraged, and maintained a close relationship with, German composer Johannes Brahms. Until 1840, Schumann wrote exclusively for the piano. Later, he composed piano and orchestral works, many Lieder (songs for voice and piano). He composed four symphonies, one opera, and other orchestral, choral, and chamber works. His best-known works include Carnaval, Symphonic Studies, Kinderszenen, Kreisleriana, and the Fantasie in C. His writings about music appeared mostly in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (New Journal for Music), a Leipzig-based publication that he co-founded. Schumann suffered from a mental disorder that first manifested in 1833 as a severe melancholic depressive episode—which recurred several times alternating with phases of "exaltation" and increasingly also delusional ideas of being poisoned or threatened with metallic items. After a suicide attempt in 1854, Schumann was admitted at his own request to a mental asylum in Endenich near Bonn. Diagnosed with psychotic melancholia, he died two years later at the age of 46 without recovering from his mental illness. Robert Schumann For more: 🤍 #MusicHistory #ClassicalMusic #Schumann

Schumann The Great Piano Works Vol.1

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24.06.2020

Check out Schumann the Great Piano Works Vol. 2 now! 🤍 This compilation includes some of Schumann's greatest piano works played by Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy and Klára Würtz. Download and streaming: 🤍 Social media: Brilliant Classics Facebook: 🤍 Brilliant Classics Instagram: 🤍 Spotify Playlists: Brilliant Classics Spotify: 🤍 New Classical Releases: 🤍 The Best of Liszt: 🤍 The Best of Bach: 🤍 Most Popular Piano Music: 🤍 Beautiful Classical Music: 🤍 Classical Music For Dinnertime: 🤍 Composer: Robert Schumann Artists: Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy, Klára Würtz Robert Schumann is perhaps best remembered for two things: the sheer number of his compositions, particularly his piano music, produced in his relatively short life; and his passionate and deeply tumultuous relationship with Clara Schumann, née Wieck, his highly accomplished pianist wife. Schumann’s life was clouded with episodes of depression and emotional turmoil, to the extent that he spent the last two years of his life in an asylum, tormented by incidents of paranoia and delusion, as well as a fading memory. Despite – or maybe because of – his turbulent emotional state, Schumann managed to complete hundreds of compositions, from expansive orchestral works to tender Lieder and even a fully fledged opera. Schumann found inspiration at different points in his life to write for different forces. The year 1840 became known as his ‘Lieder year’, and among his many inspired compositions was the cycle Frauenliebe und –leben, a compelling account of a woman’s life and love. In 1841, not long after marrying Clara, he was inspired by her encouragement to start writing for orchestra. He composed his first Symphony (‘Spring’) in February of that year, later sketching his Overture, Scherzo and Finale Op.52 in April/May and composing what would become the Piano Concerto in May. In the same year he completed his D minor Symphony, though he wouldn’t publish it for another ten years, making it his Fourth. The next year would come to be known as his ‘Chamber Music’ year; despite struggling with resentment that Clara’s popularity as a pianist was outstripping his own as a composer, Schumann managed to turn his unhappiness into a productive spell of composition. In February 1842 he began the first two String Quartets, finishing them off in the summer, and in July he composed his third. The Piano Quintet was written in October, and November saw him working on the Piano Quartet. This highly productive period saw the composer exploring a range of styles, with intricate fugues as well as lighter motifs taken from Haydn and Mozart. In 1843 Schumann began working on oratorios, including Das Paradies und die Peri, but his true ambition was to write an opera. Unimpressed with Wagner’s offerings, Schumann spent a lot of time in thought before settling on the medieval tale of Genoveva for his first operatic work, completed in 1848. The opera is far removed from the vast forces required for Wagner; the work is a scene opera, characterised by recitative-style phrasing and a sumptuously lyrical orchestral score. Throughout his life Schumann composed for the piano, inspired at first by his forbidden love for Clara (only receiving permission to marry her in 1840 after a long legal battle). His piano compositions continued well into the latter stages of his life, even during his time in the asylum. Tracklist can be found in the comments! Thanks for watching! Feel free to subscribe and visit our channel for the best classical music from the greatest composers like: Bach, Satie, Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, Chopin, Haydn, Ravel, Debussy, Verdi, Vivaldi, Handel, Brahms, Liszt, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Rachmaninoff, Wagner, Strauss, Handel, Dvorak, Schubert and many more! We upload complete albums, music for relaxing, working, studying, meditating, concentrating, instrumental music, opera, violin, classical piano music, sonatas and more! #BrilliantClassics #Schumann #Piano #Classical #Music #Great #Works #German #Composer #Germany #Asylum #Clara #Love Würtz #Schmitt #Leonardy #Wolfram #Klara

Schumann: Klavierkonzert ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester ∙ Khatia Buniatishvili ∙ Paavo Järvi

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Robert Schumann: Klavierkonzert ∙ (Auftritt) 00:00 ∙ I. Allegro affettuoso 00:30 ∙ II. Intermezzo. Andantino grazioso 15:44 ∙ III. Allegro vivace 20:31 ∙ Khatia Buniatishvili, Klavier ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester (Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra) ∙ Paavo Järvi, Dirigent ∙ Rheingau Musik Festival 2012 ∙ Wiesbaden, Kurhaus, 23. August 2012 ∙ Website: 🤍 Facebook: 🤍

Schumann - Kinderszenen Op.15, "Scenes from Childhood" | Vladimir Horowitz

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Robert Schumann - Kinderszenen Op. 15, "Scenes From Childhood", 1838. 00:38 Scene No.1 | Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples) 🤍 02:09 Scene No.2 | Kuriose Geschichte (A Curious Story) 03:15 Scene No.3 | Hasche-Mann (Blind Man's Bluff) 03:48 Scene No.4 | Bittendes Kind (Pleading Child) 04:38 Scene No.5 | Glückes genug (Happy Enough) 05:17 Scene No.6 | Wichtige Begebenheit (An Important Event) 06:09 Scene No.7 | Träumerei (Dreaming) 🤍 08:43 Scene No.8 | Am Kamin (At the Fireside) 10:02 Scene No.9 | Ritter vom Steckenpferd (Knight of the Hobbyhorse) 10:43 Scene No.10 | Fast zu ernst (Almost Too Serious) 12:12 Scene No.11 | Fürchtenmachen (Frightening) 13:52 Scene No.12 | Kind im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep) 15:31 Scene No.13 | Der Dichter spricht (The Poet Speaks) Vladimir Horowitz in Vienna, 1987. Kinderszenen, "Scenes from Childhood", Opus 15 is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written on during the spring of 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. When Schumann wrote Kinderszenen, he was deeply in love with Clara Wieck, soon to become his wife over the objections of her overbearing father. The composer worked at a feverish pace, composing these pieces in just several days. Actually, he wrote about thirty small pieces, but trimmed them to the thirteen that comprise the set. The 13 pieces showcase their creator's musical imagination at the peak of its poetic clarity. As a result, the Kinderszenen have long been staples of the repertoire as utterly charming yet substantial miniatures, the sort of compact keyboard essays in which Schumann's genius found full expression. In March of that year, Schumann wrote to Clara, "I have been waiting for your letter and have in the meantime filled several books with pieces.... You once said to me that I often seemed like a child, and I suddenly got inspired and knocked off around 30 quaint little pieces.... I selected several and titled them Kinderszenen. You will enjoy them, though you will need to forget that you are a virtuoso when you play them." The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective. They are fairly simple in terms of execution, and, of course, their subject matter deals with the world of children. From spirited games to sleeping and dreaming, Kinderszenen captures the joys and sorrows of childhood in a series of musical snapshots. Schumann described the titles as "nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation". Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Scene No. 1, "Von fremden Ländern und Menschen" (Of Foreign Lands and People), opens with a lovely melody whose basic motivic substance, by appearing in several vague guises throughout many of the other pieces, serves as a general unifying element. The seventh Scene, "Träumerei" (Reverie), is easily the most famous piece in the set; its charming melody and quieting power have recommended it to generations of concert pianists who wish to calm audiences after a long series of rousing encores. The Kinderszenen contain many delicate musical touches; Scene No. 4, "Bittendes Kind" (Pleading Child), for example, is harmonically resolved only when an unseen force (a parent?) gives in and grant the child's wish at the beginning of No. 5, "Glückes genug" (Quite Happy). In the final piece, "Der Dichter spricht" (The Poet Speaks), Schumann removes himself just a bit from the indulgent reverie to formulate a narrator's omniscient view of the child. Quietly, gently, the many moods and feelings that Schumann touched upon over the course of this remarkable 20-minute work are lovingly recalled, and the composition concludes, contentedly, in the same key of G major in which it began. The seventh item here, "Träumerei" (Dreaming), is the most popular in the set. It is a depiction of childhood innocence, vulnerability and gentleness. Many pianists have interpreted this piece in a sentimental, almost saccharine way, while others (Horowitz notably) have insisted on a more objective approach. The main theme is sweetly innocent and sentimental, clearly representing the adult Schumann's fond view of aspects of his own childhood. The melody is unforgettable, the harmonies simple, but distinctive, and the overall mood dreamy and soothing. Of the many themes associated with children - that in Brahms' Lullaby, several in Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf - the "Träumerei" melody is among the most memorable. The whole piece lasts under three minutes, but is the longest in the Kinderszenen set. Kinderscenen, Cenas Infantis, Infanaĝaj scenoj, Scènes d'enfants, Scene infantili, Barndomsscener, 子供の情景.

Schumann: Symphony No. 1; The Spring Symphony - Philharmonie Südwestfalen - Live Classical Music HD

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Spring is in the air! The Philharmonie Südwestfalen, led by Gerard Oskamp, welcomes the new season with Schumann's 'Spring Symphony', live in Het Concertgebouw. Schumann: Symphony No. 1 in B-flat major, Op. 38; The Spring Symphony Philharmonie Südwestfalen Gerard Oskamp [conductor] Recorded: Sunday the 11th of March 2018, during The Sunday Morning Concert in Het Concertgebouw Amsterdam. More AVROTROS Klassiek: ♬ Facebook: 🤍 ♬ Twitter: 🤍 ♬ Instagram: 🤍

Schumann The Great Piano Works Vol. 2

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07.11.2020

Don't forget to check out Schumann the Great Piano Works Vol. 1! 🤍 For streaming: 🤍 Composer: Robert Schumann Artists: Klára Würtz, Denys Proshayev, Vincenzo Maltempo, Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy Robert Schumann is perhaps best remembered for two things: the sheer number of his compositions, particularly his piano music, produced in his relatively short life; and his passionate and deeply tumultuous relationship with Clara Schumann, née Wieck, his highly accomplished pianist wife. Schumann’s life was clouded with episodes of depression and emotional turmoil, to the extent that he spent the last two years of his life in an asylum, tormented by incidents of paranoia and delusion, as well as a fading memory. Despite – or maybe because of – his turbulent emotional state, Schumann managed to complete hundreds of compositions, from expansive orchestral works to tender Lieder and even a fully fledged opera. Schumann found inspiration at different points in his life to write for different forces. The year 1840 became known as his ‘Lieder year’, and among his many inspired compositions was the cycle Frauenliebe und –leben, a compelling account of a woman’s life and love. In 1841, not long after marrying Clara, he was inspired by her encouragement to start writing for orchestra. He composed his first Symphony (‘Spring’) in February of that year, later sketching his Overture, Scherzo and Finale Op.52 in April/May and composing what would become the Piano Concerto in May. In the same year he completed his D minor Symphony, though he wouldn’t publish it for another ten years, making it his Fourth. The next year would come to be known as his ‘Chamber Music’ year; despite struggling with resentment that Clara’s popularity as a pianist was outstripping his own as a composer, Schumann managed to turn his unhappiness into a productive spell of composition. In February 1842 he began the first two String Quartets, finishing them off in the summer, and in July he composed his third. The Piano Quintet was written in October, and November saw him working on the Piano Quartet. This highly productive period saw the composer exploring a range of styles, with intricate fugues as well as lighter motifs taken from Haydn and Mozart. In 1843 Schumann began working on oratorios, including Das Paradies und die Peri, but his true ambition was to write an opera. Unimpressed with Wagner’s offerings, Schumann spent a lot of time in thought before settling on the medieval tale of Genoveva for his first operatic work, completed in 1848. The opera is far removed from the vast forces required for Wagner; the work is a scene opera, characterised by recitative-style phrasing and a sumptuously lyrical orchestral score. Throughout his life Schumann composed for the piano, inspired at first by his forbidden love for Clara (only receiving permission to marry her in 1840 after a long legal battle). His piano compositions continued well into the latter stages of his life, even during his time in the asylum. Tracklist can be found in the comments! Social media: Facebook: 🤍 Instagram: 🤍 Spotify: 🤍 #BrilliantClassics #Composer #Classical #Music #Schumann #Piano

Schumann: 4. Sinfonie ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester ∙ Philippe Herreweghe

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Robert Schumann: 4. Sinfonie ∙ (Auftritt) 00:00 ∙ I. Ziemlich langsam - Lebhaft 00:45 ∙ II. Romanze. Ziemlich langsam 11:09 ∙ III. Scherzo. Lebhaft 14:37 ∙ IV. Langsam - Lebhaft - Presto 19:18 ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester (Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra) ∙ Philippe Herreweghe, Dirigent ∙ Alte Oper Frankfurt, 31. Oktober 2014 ∙ Website: 🤍 ∙ Facebook: 🤍

Clara Schumann - Complete Piano Works + Presentation (Century's recording : Jozef De Beenhouwer)

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21.08.2018

❤️ If you like CM//RR content, please consider membership at our Patreon page. Thank you :) 🤍 Clara Schumann-Wieck (1819-1896) - Complete Piano Works. *Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation* (00:00-03:10) Präludien und Fugen Op.16 I.Andante - Allegro vivace / G minor (00:00) II.Allegretto - Andante / B-flat Major (03:28) III.Andante - Andante con moto / D minor (07:12) Variationen über ein Thema von Robert Schumann Op.20 (11:19) Trois Romances Op.11 I.Andante / E-flat minor (21:39) II.Andante und Allegro / G minor (24:48) III.Moderato / A-flat Major (30:09) Romance variée Op.3 (34:52) Caprices en forme de Valse Op.2 I.Allegro moderato / C Major (46:16) II.Allegro moderato / D Major (48:33) III.Andantino / E-flat Major (50:31) IV.Allegro / A-flat Major (52:33) V.Allegretto / B-flat Major (54:16) VI.Allegro risoluto / C Major (56:20) VII.Allegro ma non troppo / A-flat Major (57:37) VIII.Allegro assai / E-flat Major (59:15) IX.Allegretto / D-flat Major (1:00:29) Souvenir de Vienne, Impromptu Op.9 (1:01:29) Valse Romantique Op.4 (1:07:46) Variation de Concert sur Cavatine du Pirate de Bellini Op.8 (1:15:16) 4 Polonaises Op.1I.E-flat Major (1:30:35) II.C Major (1:34:12) III.D Major (1:37:06) IV.C Major (1:40:50) 4 Pièces Caractéristiques Op.5 I.Impromptu. Le Sabbat - Allegro furioso (1:43:40) II.Caprice à la Boléro - Presto (1:45:24) III.Romance - Andante con sentimento (1:49:12) IV.Scène Fantastique. Le Ballet des Revenantes Allegro ma non troppo (1:52:16) 4 Pièce fugitives Op.15 I.Larghetto / F Major (1:56:17) II.Un poco agitato / A minor (1:58:58) III.Andante espressivo / D Major (2:01:23) IV.Scherzo / G Major (2:06:19) 3 Fugen über Themen von J.S. Bach I.Fuga a 4 voci / E-flat Major (2:08:35) II.Fuga a 4 voci / E Major (2:10:29) III.Fuga a 4 voci / G minor (2:13:44) 3 Romanzen Op.21 I.Andante, Sehr innig bewegt, Tempo 1 / A minor (2:16:37) II.Allegretto, Sehr zart zu spielen / F minor (2:21:41) III.Agitato, Langsamer, Tempo 1 / G minor (2:22:54) Sonata in G minor I.Allegro (2:27:07) II.Adagio (2:35:28) III.Scherzo (2:38:38) IV.Rondo (2:41:15) Romanze in B minor (2:46:43) Impromtu in E Major (2:52:11) Romanze in A minor (2:54:36) Scherzo Op.10 in D minor (2:59:28) Deuxième Scherzo Op.14 in C minor (3:04:11) Prãludium in F minor (3:08:20) Soirées Musicales I.Toccatina in A minor - Presto (3:10:03) II.Notturno in F Major - Andante con moto (3:12:02) III.Mazurka in G minor - Moderato (3:16:49) IV.Ballade in D minor - Andante con moto (3:20:26) V.Mazurka in G Major - Con moto (3:26:34) VI.Polonaise in A minor - Non troppo Allegro (3:28:59) Etude in A-flat Major (3:32:41) March in E-flat Major (3:34:33) Piano : Jozef De Beenhouwer Recorded in 1990-91 Find CMRR's recordings on Spotify: 🤍 COMMENTAIRE COMPLET : VOIR PREMIER COMMENTAIRE ÉPINGLÉ. Il serait très injuste de considérer l'œuvre relativement modeste de Clara Schumann comme un simple écho ou reflet peu brillant de la musique de Robert Schumann. Le fait est que Schumann la prenait déjà au sérieux en tant que compositrice à part entière lorsqu'elle était une jeune fille de douze ans, et bien plus encore lorsqu'elle était sa fiancée et son épouse. Il a stimulé, inspiré et soutenu son travail créatif au mieux de ses capacités. Dès son plus jeune âge, Clara Schumann est initiée à la musique par son père. Elle suit des cours de violon, de piano, de chant, de théorie, d’harmonie, de composition et de contrepoint. A l’âge de neuf ans, elle est invitée à jouer chez le Dr. Ernst Carus. C’est ici qu’elle rencontre Robert Schumann, avec qui elle se marie. Remarquée par Johann Wolfgang Goethe lors de son premier concert à Leipzig, Clara Schumann rencontre par la suite un succès remarquable. Elle commence en 1830, à l’âge de onze ans, une tournée musicale en Europe, en direction de Paris. A 18 ans, elle donne de nombreux concerts à Vienne qui soulèvent l’enthousiasme, notamment de la part de Frédéric Chopin, qui lui consacre plusieurs articles élogieux dans des journaux parisiens. Elle est remarquée en particulier pour sa facilité à jouer de mémoire, acquise grâce à la formation musicale « à l’oreille » de son père. Elle sera parmi les premiers musiciens à inaugurer cette tradition de manière générale dans le monde de la musique. Non seulement concertiste et compositrice, Clara Schumann fut également une pédagogue de grande renommée.. Robert Schumann PLAYLIST (reference recordings) : 🤍

Schumann: The Three Piano Sonatas

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Composers: Robert Schumann Artists: Klára Würtz, Vincenzo Maltempo Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play): 🤍 Schumann’s father was a bookseller and publisher. After four years at a private school, the boy entered the Zwickau Gymnasium (high school) in 1820 and remained there for eight years. He began his musical education at the age of six, studying the piano. In 1827 he came under the musical influence of the Austrian composer Franz Schubert and the literary influence of the German poet Jean Paul Richter, and in the same year he composed some songs. In 1828 Schumann left school and, under family pressure, reluctantly entered the University of Leipzig as a law student. But at Leipzig his time was devoted not to the law but to song composition, improvisation at the piano, and attempts to write novels. For a few months he studied the piano seriously with a celebrated teacher, Friedrich Wieck, and thus got to know Wieck’s nine-year-old daughter Clara, a brilliant pianist who was just then beginning a successful concert career. In the summer of 1829 he left Leipzig for Heidelberg. There he composed waltzes in the style of Franz Schubert, afterward used in his piano cycle Papillons (Opus 2; 1829–31), and practiced industriously with a view to abandoning law and becoming a virtuoso pianist—with the result that his mother agreed to allow him to return to Leipzig in October 1830 to study for a trial period with Wieck, who thought highly of his talent but doubted his stability and capacity for hard work. Schumann’s Opus 1, the Abegg Variations for piano, was published in 1831. An accident to one of the fingers of his right hand, which put an end to his hopes of a career as a virtuoso, was perhaps not an unmitigated misfortune, since it confined him to composition. For Schumann, this was a period of prolific composition in piano pieces, which were published either at once or, in revised forms, later. Among them were the piano cycles Papillons and Carnaval (composed 1833–35) and the Études symphoniques (1834–37; Symphonic Studies), another work consisting of a set of variations. In 1834 Schumann had become engaged to Ernestine von Fricken, but long before the engagement was formally broken off (Jan. 1, 1836) he had fallen in love with the then 16-year-old Clara Wieck. Clara returned his kisses but obeyed her father when he ordered her to break off the relationship. Schumann found himself abandoned for 16 months, during which he wrote the great Fantasy in C Major for piano and edited the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (New Journal for Music), a periodical that he had helped to found in 1834 and of which he had been editor since early 1835. In 1837 Schumann formally asked Clara’s father for permission to marry her, but Wieck evaded his request. The couple were finally married in 1840 after Schumann had gone to court to set aside Wieck’s legal objection to the marriage. Tracklist: 00:00:00 Piano Sonata No. 1 in F-Sharp Minor, Op. 11: I. Introduzione. Un poco adagio - Allegro vivace (Klára Würtz) 00:12:42 Piano Sonata No. 1 in F-Sharp Minor, Op. 11: II. Aria (Klára Würtz) 00:15:45 Piano Sonata No. 1 in F-Sharp Minor, Op. 11: III. Scherzo e Intermezzo. Allegrissimo (Klára Würtz) 00:20:39 Piano Sonata No. 1 in F-Sharp Minor, Op. 11: IV. Finale. Allegro un poco maestoso (Klára Würtz) 00:32:30 Piano Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 22: I. So rasch wie möglich schneller- noch schneller (Klára Würtz) 00:38:16 Piano Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 22: II. Andantino. Getragen (Klára Würtz) 00:43:16 Piano Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 22: III. Scherzo. Sehr rasch und markiert (Klára Würtz) 00:44:52 Piano Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 22: IV. Rondo. Presto (Klára Würtz) 00:50:04 Piano Sonata in F Minor, Op. 14: I. Allegro (Vincenzo Maltempo) 00:58:05 Piano Sonata in F Minor, Op. 14: II. Scherzo - Molto commodo (Vincenzo Maltempo) 01:03:53 Piano Sonata in F Minor, Op. 14: III. Quasi variazioni - Andantino (De Clara Wieck) - 4 Variations (Vincenzo Maltempo) 01:10:41 Piano Sonata in F Minor, Op. 14: IV. Finale - Prestissimo possibile (Vincenzo Maltempo) Social media: Facebook: 🤍 Instagram: 🤍 Spotify Playlists: Spotify: 🤍 New Classical Releases: 🤍 The Best of Bach: 🤍 Beautiful Classical Music: 🤍 Classical Music For Dinnertime: 🤍 #BrilliantClassics #Classical #Music #Composer #Trumpet #Sonata #Oboe #Oboes #String #Timpani #Concerto #Johann #Melchior #Molter #Otto #Sauter #Franz #Wagnermeyer #Cappella #Istropolitana #Nicol #Matt

Schumann Piano Concerto, in A minor, OP. 54 Martha Argerich & Riccardo Chailly

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11.11.2012

Uma bela interpretação do lindo Concerto para Piano de Robert Schumann com Martha Argerich ao Piano e a Gewandhausorchester, conduzida pelo maestro Riccardo Chailly

Schumann - Träumerei, "Kinderszenen" No. 7, Scenes from Childhood | Vladimir Horowitz

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14.04.2012

Robert Schumann - Kinderscenen Op. 15, Scenes From Childhood, 1838. - Nº 1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples) 🤍 - Nº 7. Träumerei (Dreaming) 🤍 - Complete performance: 🤍 When Schumann wrote Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood), he was deeply in love with Clara Wieck, soon to become his wife over the objections of her overbearing father. The composer worked at a feverish pace, composing these pieces in just several days. Actually, he wrote about thirty small pieces, but trimmed them to the thirteen that comprise the set. They are fairly simple in terms of execution, and, of course, their subject matter deals with the world of children. Schumann, however, pointed out that they were not intended for children. The seventh item here, "Träumerei" (Dreaming), is the most popular in the set. It is a depiction of childhood innocence, vulnerability and gentleness. Many pianists have interpreted this piece in a sentimental, almost saccharine way, while others (Horowitz notably) have insisted on a more objective approach. The main theme is sweetly innocent and sentimental, clearly representing the adult Schumann's fond view of aspects of his own childhood. The melody is unforgettable, the harmonies simple, but distinctive, and the overall mood dreamy and soothing. Of the many themes associated with children that in Brahms' Lullaby, several in Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf the "Träumerei" melody is among the most memorable. The whole piece lasts under three minutes, but is the longest in the Kinderszenen set. Most pianists who play Kinderszenen rarely excerpt it, but when an individual piece from it is played by them in concert, "Träumerei" is usually their choice. Horowitz was known to play it as an encore on several occasions. From spirited games to sleeping and dreaming, Kinderszenen captures the joys and sorrows of childhood in a series of musical snapshots. Schumann described the titles as "nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation". The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective; unlike a number of Schumann's collections of piano character pieces (e.g.Album for the Young,Op.68), the Kinderszenen are not intended to be played by children. Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Almost all of the Kinderszenen are miniature ternary (ABA) forms. Horowitz in Vienna Kinderszenen Robert Schumann - "Scenes from Childhood" | Kinderszenen, Opus 15, N.º 7 Träumerei, Traumerei, Dreaming, A Sonhar, Somiant, Rêverie, Revaĵo, Sogno, Drømmeri. Kinderszenen, Kinderscenen, Scenes from Childhood, Cenas da Infância, Cenas Infantis, Infanaĝaj scenoj, Scènes d'enfants, Scene infantili, Barndomsscener, 子供の情景.

100% Pure Schumann Resonance for Grounding, Stability, & Well-Being 🙏

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03:06:37
27.01.2021

⚡ Welcome to Catalyst University! I am Kevin Tokoph, PT, DPT. I hope you enjoy the video! Please leave a like and subscribe! 🙏 INSTAGRAM | 🤍thecatalystuniversity Follow me on Instagram 🤍thecatalystuniversity for additional helpful content and for my more fun side: Pets, Workouts, Dragon Ball Z SleepPhones® | Need to Relax? Ocean waves, ASMR, Rainstorms, and Theta Waves while you sleep with SleepPhones® at this link: 🤍 - Use the Coupon Code, “CatalystRelax”, at the checkout for some awesome savings. More details here in my new video: 🤍 MERCHANDISE Be sure to check out custom Catalyst University merchandise! LINK | 🤍 PATREON LINK | 🤍 EXTRA TAGS Kevin Tokoph Tokoph Catalyst University Biology Biochemistry Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy Physiology USMLE NPTE Medical school Med school Physical therapy PT school Crash course Tutorial Psychometrics Sensitivity Specificity Special test Demonstration Cervical spine Thoracic spine Lumbar spine Low back pain Chiropractic Chiropractor Chiropractic adjustment Technique Manipulation Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation Blood supply Nerve Brain Spinal cord Treatment Therapeutic Exercise TherEx Therapeutic Activity TherAc Neuromuscular Neuromuscular Reeducation Modalities

100% Pure Schumann Resonance for Grounding, Stability, & Well-Being [9-hours] 🙏

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100% Pure Schumann Resonance for Grounding, Stability, & Well-Being [9-hours] 🙏 #schumann #schumannresonance #schumannfrequency #7.83hz 3 Hour Version | 🤍 INSTAGRAM | 🤍thecatalystuniversity Follow me on Instagram 🤍thecatalystuniversity for additional helpful content and other things I find fun and interesting including but not limited to: Helpful Anatomy & Physiology Summary Figures Rescores of Famous Movies and TV shows with Epic Music (e.g., Dragon Ball Z) Cats & More Cats MERCHANDISE Be sure to check out custom Catalyst University merchandise! LINK | 🤍 PATREON LINK | 🤍

Schumann: 3. Sinfonie (»Rheinische«) ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester ∙ Marek Janowski

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Robert Schumann: 3. Sinfonie (»Rheinische«) ∙ (Auftritt) 00:00 ∙ I. Lebhaft 00:22 ∙ II. Scherzo. Sehr mäßig 09:10 ∙ III. Nicht schnell 15:57 ∙ IV. Feierlich 21:14 ∙ V. Lebhaft – Schneller 26:16 ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester – Frankfurt Radio Symphony ∙ Marek Janowski, Dirigent ∙ Alte Oper Frankfurt, 4. März 2016 ∙ Website: 🤍 ∙ Facebook: 🤍

Schumann - Symphonies No.1,2,3,4 + Presentation (reference recording : Wolfgang Sawallisch)

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❤️ If you like CM//RR content, please consider membership at our Patreon page. Thank you :) 🤍 Robert Schumann (1810-1856) - The Four Symphonies / Overture Op.52 *Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation* (00:00-03:52) Symphony No.1 in B flat, Op.38 « Spring / Frühlings / Printemps » I.Andante poco maestoso - Allegro molto vivace (00:00) II.Larghetto (11:30) III.Scherzo - Molto Vivace (18:33) IV.Allegro animato e grazioso (23:58) Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52 I.Ouvertüre ; Andante con molto - allegro (32:15) II.Scherzo - Vivo (38:50) III.Finale - Allegro molto vivace (42:42) Symphony No.2 in C, Op.61 I.Sostenuto assai - Allegro ma non troppo (49:18) II.Scherzo - Allegro vivace (1:01:47) III.Adagio espressivo (1:08:31) IV.Allegro molto vivace (1:18:51) Symphony No.3 in E flat, Op.97 « Rhenish / Rheinische / Rhénane » I.Lebhaft (1:27:02) II.Scherzo - Sehr mäßig (1:35:59) III.Nicht schnell (1:42:41) IV.Feierlich (1:48:11) V.Lebhaft (1:55:04) Symphony No.4 in D minor, Op.120 I.Ziemlich langsam - Lebhaft (2:00:36) II.Romanze - Ziemlich langsam (2:10:55) III.Scherzo - Lebhaft (2:15:05) IV.Langsam - Lebhaft (2:21:55) Staatskapelle Dresden Wolfgang Sawallisch Recorded in 1972 🔊 FOLLOW US on SPOTIFY (Profil: CMRR) : 🤍 🔊 Download CMRR's recordings in High fidelity audio (QOBUZ) : 🤍 Le mariage de Schumann avec Clara Wieck en 1840 eut pour effet de changer radicalement la nature de sa production créative. Avant 1840, il n’avait composé presque que pour le piano, pourtant, après son mariage, par comparaison, il n’écrivit guère pour son propre instrument. Clara écrivit dans son journal (1839) que son plus ‘grand désir’ était que Robert composât pour l’orchestre. Deux ans après (1841), les Schumann enfin installés dans un bonheur familial, la Symphonie « Le Printemps/Spring » était née. La première execution eut lieu à Leipzig le 31 mars 1841 sous la direction de Mendelssohn. Son exubérance, sa poésie et son originalité firent bonne impression. C’est pourquoi Schumann se lança immédiatement dans une autre oeuvre symphonique. La Symphonie No.2 en en Ut Majeur a toujours été un peu comme la Cendrillon des symphonies de Schumann, moins jouée que les trois autres. Mais bien qu’elle dévoile sans doute ses beautés plus lentement que ses compagnes, c’est un ouvrage d’une puissance irrésistible, dont la conception classique s’avère la plus imposante parmi les symphonies de Schumann. Peut-être l’apport le plus original et le plus important de Schumann à la forme symphonique fut-il sa technique de relation entre les thèmes et de métamorphose d’un mouvement à l’autre. Mais, plus révélateur encore, est l’art dont Schumann traite la mélodie de l’Adagio : poignante, troublante, elle est développée de manière approfondie dans des étoffes musicales d’une grave beauté puis, dans une transformation inspirée, elle réapparaît comme le second sujet du finale. En 1850, les Schumann quitte Dresde pour Düsseldorf où Robert est nommé directeur musicale de l’orchestre de la ville. Il aimait la Rhénanie depuis longtemps; aussi s’enflamma-t-il à l'idée de composer une symphonie qui célébrât cette région riche en associations légendaires et historiques. On peut dire que la Rhénane est la plus belle, sans doute la plus joyeuse et la plus spontanée des dernières oeuvres symphoniques de Schumann. Sa volonté descriptive initiale s’est élargie à cette correspondance essentielle entre la nature et l’âme romantique et c’est cette capacité poétique qui la fait si touchante. « Ma prochaine symphonie symphonie s’appellera ‘’Clara’’ et j’y peindrai son portrait au moyen de flûtes, de hautbois et de harpes ». Clara reçu en effet la partition de cette Symphonie en Ré mineur le 13 septembre 1841 pour son 22e anniversaire. Toutefois, Schumann la révisera et la réorchestrera quelque années plus tard et ce n’est qu’en 1851 qu’elle prendra sa forme définitive. Cette symphonie pour laquelle Schumann indiqua que les mouvements devaient être joué sans pause, est plus intense, plus troublante. Elle est d’une originalité révolutionnaire; presque tout le matériel s’y développe à partir des motifs annoncés dans la lente introduction. De toutes les intégrales parues jusqu’ici, celle de Sawallisch reste l’une des plus homogène, dynamique, fine, réussie et convaincante. Pas de pages mortes ou languissantes dans ce monument où l’orchestre de Dresde s’affirme comme un des meilleurs du monde. Il y a dans cette orchestre un scintillement naturel de la sonorité que Sawallisch sait utilisé pour donner un élan et une légèreté constante à cette intégrale. Robert Schumann PLAYLIST (reference recordings) 🤍 Mendelssohn - Complete Symphonies No.1,2,3,4,5 (recording of the Century : Wolfgang Sawallisch) 🤍

Schumann: Violin Concerto | Isabelle Faust and the Freiburger Barockorchester

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Isabelle Faust performs Robert Schumann’s Violin Concerto in D minor, WoO 1 together with the Freiburger Barockorchester (FBO) under conductor Pablo Heras Casado. The concert was held in May 2014 in the Berliner Philharmonie. The Violin Concerto in D minor is the only concert for violin from Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), and his last work for orchestra. Written in just two weeks in the Fall of 1853, its conception can be traced in part back to a suggestion from Joseph Joachim – one of the 19th century’s most significant violinists. It was never performed during Schumann’s lifetime; following a suicide attempt in Spring of 1854 he was admitted to a psychiatric hospital, where he would pass away in 1856. It was only in November 1937 that Schumann’s violin concert received its premiere. An extensively reworked version was played by the Berlin Philharmonic at a propaganda event by the National Socialists. The conductor was Karl Böhm; Georg Kulenkampff played solo violin. The original version would first be performed in the USA in December, 1937, by Yehudi Menuhin. For many long years, Schumann’s violin concert remained controversial, many believing they detected hints of the illness Schumann was living with – already public knowledge – in the piece. In the years since, however, it has become a standard in every violinist’s repertoire. It’s one of Isabelle Faust’s credits – she performed the violin concert for her debut with the Berliner Philharmonic in 2009. The Freiburger Barockorchester (“Freiburg Baroque Orchestra”) was begun with a spontaneous idea that has since developed into a unique, musical success story. On New Year's Eve some 30 years ago, music students in Freiburg decided to form an orchestra dedicated exclusively to historically-informed performance practice, played on period instruments. The FBO performed its first concerts in the Freiburg region in 1987. Today, the orchestra has become world-famous. In addition to its own concert series in Freiburg, Stuttgart and Berlin, the FBO performs in the foremost international concert halls, and is considered one of the world’s most distinguished early-music ensembles. 00:00 Vigoroso, ma non troppo presto 16:05 Lento 21:22 Animato, ma non presto Watch more concerts in your personal concert hall: 🤍 Subscribe to DW Classical Music: 🤍 #RobertSchumann #ViolinConcerto #IsabelleFaust #FreiburgerBarockorchester #PabloHerasCasado

Robert Schumann: Derde symfonie in Es-groot, op.97, 'Rheinische'

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Meer klassiek op 🤍 11 december 2011, Grote Zaal van het Concertgebouw Amsterdam. Robert Schumann: Symphony no.3, op.97, 'Rheinische'. Radio Kamer Filharmonie o.l.v. Philippe Herreweghe

Schumann: Fantasie in C, Op.17 (Andsnes)

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00:00 – Durchaus phantastisch und liedenschaftlich vorzutragen 12:21 – Massig. Durchaus energisch 19:10 – Langsam getragen. Durchweg leise zu halten An almost cathartically intense performance of Schumann’s most important large-scale piano work, and one of the most important in the entire period. The Op.17 Fantasy is remarkable for many reasons – the bedazzling variety of its textures, its addictive quirkiness (Schumann probably had the most acute sense of the fantastic among all the Romantic composers), its expressive power (especially in the uplifting final movement). But one feature not often noticed is the structural complexity of the first movement, which represents Schumann’s most successful engagement with sonata form. The biggest mystery of the first movement is the notorious Im Legendenton [04:43], which though beautiful seems to constitute a massive disruption of the development section [which begins at 03:09], apparently unconnected as it is to the rest of the movement. In fact, the Im Legendenton is a direct outgrowth the inner-voice theme at [0:59], and a nice example of Schumann’s skill at conjuring new material out of apparently nothing. Nonetheless, the Im Legendenton is not at all a conventional episode in a development section: the development is meant to be unstable, and to be open-ended – it prepares for the arrival of the tonic and the recapitulation. But the Im Legendenton’s structure is too well-formed, its tonality too stable, and its posture too inward-looking to count as a development per se. There are other structural tricks going on here too: the recapitulation [which begins at 08:03 in the wrong key of C minor] directly invokes the beginning of the development(!) section [at 10:08] to firmly re-establish the tonality of C major, an unusual step that Schumann also takes in his other sonatas. It’s an ingenious and natural gesture, despite its apparent oddness: given how prominent the development is in the movement, it seems fitting that the recapitulation expands to encompass material from the development section. There’s also the fact that the opening theme begins a pedal point on G that is never properly resolved until the perfectly cadence coming nearly 300 bars later – a nice instance of long-term harmonic tension and resolution. (This is a feature of the Op.17 as a whole – a progression with a clear harmonic goal is introduced, only for that goal to be sidestepped and delayed to a much further point.) It’s also worth noting that a lot of the structural complexity of the first movement is mirrored in the last. Take its opening: we’ve got this tranquil four-bar curtain, and then 6 bars introducing the main melody. And as soon as this melody ends we get some pretty aggressive developmental treatment of the first two bars of the melody [starting at 20:02] which seems out-of-place coming so early in the movement. And then – what appears to have been such a promising theme simply vanishes. It will be some time, in fact before the main thematic material is directly presented. There’s a lot more at work here: the sly references between each movement, for e.g., or the ingenuity of the first movement’s development section. But it’s basically impossible to get it all down here, so just listening will have to do – though that’s not too bad, surely.

Schumann - Fantasie op.17 - Richter studio

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Robert Schumann Fantasie op.17 I. Durchaus phantastisch und leidenschaftlich vorzutragen 0:00 II. Mässig - Durchaus energisch 13:53 III. Langsam getragen - Durchweg leise zu halten 20:40 Sviatoslav Richter Studio recording, London 1-3 & 5.VIII.1961

Schumann - "Träumerei" (Dreaming)

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Robert Schumann - "Träumerei" from the Kinderszenen Op. 15 ("Scenes from Childhood") Subscribe and follow on social media. I would love to meet you!! 🔔Click the bell icon, so you are notified of the next video🔔 🎧🎶 iTunes: 🤍 🎧🎶 Spotify: 🤍 I hope you all enjoy this channel! Please leave a comment if you have any pieces that you want to listen to. Instagram 🤍 Facebook 🤍 Tiktok 🤍 🤍 Thank you in advance for your generous contribution and I encourage you to participate in spreading happiness through beautiful classical music with Traum. Donation Paypal 🤍 Buy me a coffee 🤍 Patreon 🤍 #Schumann #Träumerei #Dreaming #Piano #Classic #Traummusic

Schumann: Sonata No.1 in F-sharp minor, Op.11 (Perahia)

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A sonata which illustrates beautifully Schumann’s narrative approach to the form, featuring typically vivid flights of fantasy bound together by the device of a falling perfect 5th. The falling 5th is first heard in the LH in the introduction [and is highlighted at 1:17 and 1:23], before it opens the main body of 1st movement [2:37] (with constant recurrences - 2:56, 3:00 etc). The 2nd movement unfolds over a sustained 5th in the bass, while the melody is punctuated by falling 5ths in the LH [12:56, 13:03, 14:29 etc], still with the same insistent dotted rhythm. In the 3rd movement the falling 5th appears in the LH at 16:04, and in the 4th movement the dotted falling 5th features prominently in the second theme: 19:56. 00:00 Mvt 1. Featuring an extraordinary introduction, with a melody fully formed enough to be considered a self-contained entity. Even when the introductory theme returns at the centre of the ensuing Allegro [9:15!], its reappearance seems to be an interruption, a sudden space opening in the midst of profound violence. In reality, of course, the introduction is a startlingly original bit of long-range anticipation, since its falling 5ths bind the whole work together. Note also the rapid harmonic turns of the allegro, and the way the falling 5th is absorbed into the ornamentation. 12:37 Mvt 2, Aria. Based on a song Schumann wrote when he was 18. It is significant that the falling 5ths were not in the original. Liszt singled out this movement for special praise, calling it ‘a song of great passion, expressed with fullness and calm’. 15:22 Mvt 3. A scherzo with two trios. The first quasi-trio's opening bars are underpinned by the 1st movement’s ‘rocking’ fifths motif, played pianissimo leggierissimo. The second trio ('Intermezzo') is a lovely parody of a polonaise, and Schumann marks it, appropriately enough, Alla burla, ma pomposo. There is a further surprise in store before the scherzo returns: a recitative, with a lone oboe rudely silenced by the whole orchestra, before the scherzo returns *at the wrong pitch* —a typically Schumannesque touch. 19:33 Mvt 3, Finale. A sonata-rondo featuring some pretty cool textures: tremolos mimicking a crescendo over a drum roll; a staccato passage near the close, marked quasi pizzicato; tutti chords punched out at top speed [22:17]. Notice how Schumann, with wicked inventiveness, pushes a duple-metre theme into the strait-jacket of three beats to the bar: rhythmic playfulness was one of the hallmarks of his style. The dramatic differences between this movement's two themes mirror the characters which Schumann quasi-allegorically adopted when composing: Florestan and Eusebius (representing the more turbulent and reflective sides of his character respectively). Perahia handles the interpretative challenges of this difficult work extremely well: the rhythms are vital and intense, the knotty passages clear, the contrasts sharply (but not schizophrenically) outlined, and there is a clear sense of a coherent whole (often difficult to achieve in Schumann).

Martha Argerich: Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54(2022)

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Wiener Philharmoniker conducted by Zubin Mehta September 18, 2022 Musikverein, Goldener Saal 00:35 I. Allegro affettuoso 16:00 II. Intermezzo; Andante grazioso 21:50 III. Finale; Allegro vivace Encore: Schumann Kinderszenen Op. 15 34:52 1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen

Schumann - Davidsbündlertänze, op. 6 (Audio+Sheet) [Kempff]

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Wilhelm Kempff, piano 00:00 No. 1 - Lebhaft 01:23 No. 2 - Innig 02:52 No. 3 - Etwas hahnbüchen 04:23 No. 4 - Ungeduldig 05:13 No. 5 - Einfach 07:02 No. 6 - Sehr rasch 09:06 No. 7 - Nicht schnell 12:50 No. 8 - Frisch 13:53 No. 9 - Lebhaft 15:36 No. 10 - Balladenmässig, sehr rasch 17:14 No. 11 - Einfach 19:01 No. 12 - Mit Humor 19:52 No. 13 - Wild und lustig 23:10 No. 14 - Zart und singend 26:07 No. 15 - Frisch 28:04 No. 16 - Mit gutem Humor 30:01 No. 17 - Wie aus der Ferne 34:27 No. 18 - Nicht schnell

Schumann: Piano Concerto in A minor, Op.54 (Shelley)

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A deep, warm, sensitive recording that features the sort of freely lateral playing that brings out the best in Schumann. The tempos are brisk, light, but there is not a hint of the sort of aggrieved virtuosity that often spoils Schumann. 00:00 Mvt I, Allegro affettuoso. If you think the opening theme is played too fast, you might be surprised to learn that Schumann does not indicate at measure 4 that you're supposed to slow down to an andante, though nearly all pianists do this. Shelley keeps the allegretto throughout, and his account features some gorgeous interaction between pianist and orchestra, possibly facilitated by the fact that Shelley is conducting from the piano. 12:53 Mvt II, Intermezzo. Yet another instance of Shelley choosing a refreshingly fleet and graceful tempo (the movement is marked not andante but andantino grazioso, though it's rare to hear this carried through in practice). 17:36 Mvt III, Allegro Vivace. Beautifully transparent textures, perky and precise figuration, with lovely woodwind playing and surprisingly exuberant cross-rhythms.

Schumann - Album for the young | Classical Music

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🎧 Listen to "The Best of Classical Music" on Spotify: 🤍 ▶▶ Order “Schumann – Essential Classic” [3CD] on Amazon: 🤍 ▶▶ Order “Schumann – Essential Classic” [3CD] on Ebay: 🤍 These tracks are available for sync licensing in web video productions, corporate videos, films, ads and music compilations. For further information and licensing please contact info🤍halidononline.com Subscribe to our channel: 🤍 Like us on Facebook: 🤍 ROBERT SCHUMANN Album for the Young (Album für die Jugend) Op. 68 01 Melody 00:00 02 Soldiers' March 01:04 03 Humming Song 02:08 04 Chorale 03:00 05 A little piece 04:11 06 The poor orphan 05:01 07 Hunting song 06:35 08 The wild rider 07:39 09 Folk song 08:13 10 The happy farmer, returning from work 09:41 11 Sicilienne 10:26 12 Knecht Ruprecht 12:07 13 May, sweet may 14:31 14 Little etude 16:17 15 Spring song 18:43 16 First sorrow 20:33 17 The little morning wanderer 22:08 18 The reaper's song 23:20 19 Little romance 24:33 20 Rustic song 25:35 21 Untitled 27:13 22 Roundelay 29:06 23 The Horseman 30:49 24 Harvest song 32:08 25 Echoes from the theatre 33:25 26 Untitled 35:06 27 A little canon 37:09 28 Remembrance 38:51 29 The stranger 40:51 30 Untitled 43:30 31 Song of war 46:22 32 Sheherazade 47:33 33 Gathering of the grapes, happy time 50:49 34 Theme 52:25 35 Mignon 54:33 36 Italian mariners' song 58:05 37 Sailors' song 59:20 38 Wintertime I 1:01:26 39 Wintertime II 1:03:32 40 Little fugue 1:07:23 41 Northern song 1:09:37 42 Figured chorale 1:11:20 43 New Year's Eve 1:12:40 Thank you so much for watching this video by Halidon Music channel, we hope you enjoyed it! Don't forget to share it and subscribe to our channel 🤍 All the best classical music ever on Halidon Music Youtube Channel: The Best Classical Music Playlist Mix, The Best Classical Music For Studying, Classical Music For Reading, Classical Music For Concentration, Classical Music for Sleeping and Relaxation, Instrumental Music, Background Music, Opera Music, Piano, Violin & Orchestral Masterpieces by the greatest composers of all time. The very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Ravel, Dvorák… #classicalmusic #schumann

Schumann: 2. Sinfonie ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester ∙ Marek Janowski

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Robert Schumann: 2. Sinfonie ∙ I. Sostenuto assai – Allegro ma non troppo 00:00 ∙ II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace 12:13 ∙ III. Adagio espressivo 19:18 ∙ IV. Allegro molto vivace 28:40 ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester – Frankfurt Radio Symphony ∙ Marek Janowski, Dirigent ∙ Alte Oper Frankfurt, 17. November 2017 ∙ Website: 🤍 ∙ Facebook: 🤍

Schumann - Complete Symphonies Nos.1 'Spring', 2, 3 'Rhenish', 4 (reference record.: Otto Klemperer)

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❤️ If you like CM//RR content, please consider membership at our Patreon page. Thank you :) 🤍 Robert Schumann (1810-1856) - The Four Symphonies / Overture (Faust) Symphony No.1 in B flat, Op.38 « Spring / Frühlings / Printemps » Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation (just below) 00:00 Op.38 I.Andante poco maestoso - Allegro molto vivace 12:29 Op.38 II.Larghetto 19:54 Op.38 III.Scherzo - Molto Vivace 26:01 Op.38 IV.Allegro animato e grazioso Symphony No.2 in C, Op.61 Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation (35:37-37:53) 35:37 Op.61 I.Sostenuto assai - Allegro ma non troppo 49:48 Op.61 II.Scherzo - Allegro vivace 57:42 Op.61 III.Adagio espressivo 1:06:16 Op.61 IV.Allegro molto vivace Symphony No.3 in E flat, Op.97 « Rhenish / Rheinische / Rhénane » Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation (1:16:44-1:18:51) 1:16:44 Op.97 I.Lebhaft 1:27:40 Op.97 II.Scherzo - Sehr mäßig 1:35:38 Op.97 III.Nicht schnell 1:42:22 Op.97 IV.Feierlich 1:48:00 Op.97 V.Lebhaft Symphony No.4 in D minor, Op.120* Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation (1:55:27-1:56:47) 1:55:27 Op.120 I.Ziemlich langsam - Lebhaft 2:06:53 Op.120 II.Romanze - Ziemlich langsam 2:10:46 Op.120 III.Scherzo - Lebhaft 2:17:14 Op.120 IV.Langsam - Lebhaft 2:23:52 Szenen aus „Faust" Overture/Ouvertüre/Ouverture Click to activate the English subtitles for the presentation (1:23:52-2:24:37) Schumann - Szenen aus Goethes Faust (D.Fischer-Dieskau - reference recording: Bernhard Klee): 🤍 New Philharmonia Orchestra Philharmonia Orchestra* Conductor: Otto Klemperer Recorded in 1960-69, at London 🔊Find CMRR's recordings on Spotify : 🤍 🔊Download CMRR's recordings in High fidelity audio : 🤍 Symphony No.1 Schumann's marriage to Clara Wieck in 1840, after years of bitter opposition from her father, brought a fundamental change in his creative output. Before 1840 he had composed almost entirely for the piano; yet after his marriage he wrote comparatively little for his own instrument. Instead he plunged with characteristic ardour into new or little-tried genres: in 1840 he composed well over 100 songs; 1841 was dominated by orchestral works, while in 1842 he absorbed himself in chamber music, producing his three string quartets, the piano quartet and the piano quintet. Schumann had sketched a symphony, in G minor, as early as 1832 but, it seems, lacked the confidence to complete the work. It was only seven years later, after hearing the premiére of Schubert's hitherto unknown "Great" C major Symphony, that he was again fired to create a symphony; at the same time Clara wrote in her diary that it was her "highest wish" that Robert should compose for orchestra. Two years later, with the Schumanns at last secure in their domestic happiness, the "Spring" Symphony was born, composed in a surge of enthusiasm between 23 January and 20 February 1841. The premiere, under Mendelssohn, took place in Leipzig on 31 March. As the composer revealed, the symphony was originally inspired by a springtime poem by Adolph Böttger, and originally contained descriptive titles for each movement-'Spring's Awakening", "Evening", "Merry Playmates" and "Full Spring'l—which were later discarded. The opening fanfare, of which Schumann wrote that he wanted "the trumpets to sound as if from on high, like a call to awaken", is the symphony's germinal cell, generating both the irrepressibly buoyant main theme of the allegro and the rapt melody of the slow movement. Its dotted rhythm emerges again, marcatissimo on trombones, midway through the finale, in which Schumann draws a pointed contrast between the powerful initial scale figure that dominates the development and the elegantly skittish main theme. Though the scherzo, with its two independent trios (a symphonic innovation of Schumann's) and hushed, lingering coda, has no overt connection with the opening fanfare, its main idea is subtly foreshadowed, on trombones and bassoons pianissimo (an extraordinary sonority), near the close of the slow movement. Please activate the subtitles for the description of the other three symphonies and the overture. Robert Schumann PLAYLIST (reference recordings): 🤍

Robert Schumann: Fantasiestücke Op. 12 (1837)

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09.01.2016

Fantasiestücke (Fantasy pieces) Op. 12 (1837) (score), Robert Schumann (1810-1856). Martha Argerich, piano. 1. Des Abends (00:00) 2. Aufschwung (3:25) 3. Warum? (6:23) 4. Grillen (8:27) 5. In der Nacht (11:20) 6. Fabel (14:46) 7. Traumes Wirren (17:20) 8. End vom Lied (19:32) Robert Schumann's Fantasiestücke, Op. 12, is a set of eight pieces for piano, written in 1837. The title was inspired by the 1814 collection of novellas Fantasiestücke in Callots Manier by one of his favourite authors, E. T. A. Hoffmann. Schumann dedicated the pieces to Fräulein Anna Robena Laidlaw, an accomplished and attractive 18-year-old Scottish pianist with whom Schumann had become good friends. Schumann composed the pieces with the characters Florestan and Eusebius in mind, representing the duality of his personality. Eusebius depicts the dreamer in Schumann while Florestan represents his passionate side. These two characters parlay with one another throughout the collection, ending self-reflectively with Eusebius in "Ende vom Lied". I don't own the video nor the scores shown in the video. audio: 🤍 score: 🤍

Schumann: Piano Concerto - Nelson Freire, Piano Live Concert HD

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Meer klassiek op 🤍 Rotterdam Philharmonisch Orkest o.l.v. Claus Peter Flor Opgenomen zondag 27 november in de grote zaal van De Doelen in Rotterdam. Robert Schumann: Piano Concerto op.54 in a minor Nelson Freire, piano Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Claus Peter Flor

Robert Schumann: Waldszenen Op. 82 (1849)

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Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Waldszenen (Forest scenes/Escenas del bosque, 1849) Maria Joao Pires, piano 1. Eintritt (00:00) 2. Jäger auf der Lauer (01:44) 3. Einsame Blumen (03:02) 4. Verrufene Stelle (04:57) 5. Freundliche Landschaft (07:56) 6. Herberge (08:58) 7. Vogel als Prophet (10:56) 8. Jagdlied (13:57) 9. Abschied (16:19) Waldszenen ("Forest Scenes"), Opus 82, is a set of nine short solo piano pieces composed by Robert Schumann in 1848-1849, but first published in 1850-1851 in Leipzig by Bartholf Senff.[1] On the set, Schumann wrote: "The titles for pieces of music, since they again have come into favor in our day, have been censured here and there, and it has been said that 'good music needs no sign-post.' Certainly not, but neither does a title rob it of its value; and the composer, by adding one, at least prevents a complete misunderstanding of the character of his music. What is important is that such a verbal heading should be significant and apt. It may be considered the test of the general level of the composer's education." Please take into account that the audio and the sheet music shown in the video are not mine. -audio: 🤍 -partitura: 🤍

Robert Schumann: 8 Noveletten Op. 21 (1838)

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8 Noveletten Op. 21 (1838) (score), by Robert Schumann (1810-1856). Dino Ciani, piano. 1. Markirt und kräftig [Marcato and strong] (00:00) 2. Äusserst rasch und mit Bravour [Extremely fast and with spirit] (5:07) 3. Leicht und mit Humor [Leggiero and with humour] (10:24) 4. Ballmässig. Sehr munter [Moderato dance/Like a ball. Very lively] (14:56) 5. Rauschend und festlich [Noisy and festive] (18:08) 6. Sehr lebhaft mit vielem Humor [Very lively with a lot of humour] (27:17) 7. Äusserst rasch [Extremely fast] (31:09) 8. Sehr lebhaft [Very lively] (34:24) Robert Schumann (8 June 1810 – 29 July 1856) was a German composer and influential music critic. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era. Schumann left the study of law, intending to pursue a career as a virtuoso pianist. He had been assured by his teacher Friedrich Wieck that he could become the finest pianist in Europe, but a hand injury ended this dream. Schumann then focused his musical energies on composing. The Novelletten, Op. 21, is a set of 8 pieces for solo piano, written by Robert Schumann in 1838. The Novelletten were composed during February 1838, a period of great struggle for the composer. Schumann originally intended the eight pieces to be performed together as a group however they are often performed separately with great success. This set of pieces is an excellent example of Schumann's keyboard style. There's an earlier version I uploaded with the recording of the great Spanish pianist Alicia de Larrocha. You can visit it here: 🤍 I don't own the audios nor the scores shown in the video. -audio: Dino Ciani 🤍 -score: 🤍

Robert Schumann - Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44

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- Composer: Robert Schumann (8 June 1810 29 July 1856) - Performers: Martha Argerich (piano), Dora Schwarzberg (violin), Lucia Hall (violin), Nobuko Imai (viola), Mischa Maisky (cello) - Year of recording: 1994 Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44, written in 1842. 00:00 - I. Allegro brillante 09:07 - II. In Modo d'una Marcia. Un poco largamente 18:13 - III. Scherzo. Molto vivace - Trio 1 & 2 22:39 - IV. Allegro, ma non troppo Robert Schumann's Quintet for piano and strings in E flat major has earned a place of distinction among piano quintets, one of only a handful, including Johannes Brahms' one entry in the genre and Dvorák's Op. 81 [both uploaded on this channel], that are known to more than just a few performers. Although Schumann's merits as a composer of "pure" instrumental music have been debated, no astute listener can doubt that the E flat Quintet is the product of a most fertile musical imagination fresh, buoyant, and inventive. 1842 was Schumann's year of chamber music (as 1840 was that of song): after producing three string quartets, Schumann decided to make a happy synthesis of his recently acquired fluency with strings with the piano his native instrument. - The first movement, marked Allegro brillante, commences with a joyous idea that rings in the ear long after the texture has taken on a gentler tone. Musings on this idea are set against characteristic pianistic figurations before the second theme, a dialogue between the cello and viola takes over. The development section begins in the key of A flat minor in the piano; fragments of melody are voiced by the other players as the music moves into distant harmonic regions. The incessant modulation and fragmentary thematic development are interrupted by a bold assertion of the previously heroic primary theme. Schumann makes little change to his exposition over the course of the recapitulation, only altering a few bars to make the necessary harmonic change, with the second theme, as expected, being re-cast in the tonic instead of dominant. - In modo d'una Marcia, Un poco largamente is the marking of the following movement, throughout which a funereal atmosphere predominates. The stark, mysterious primary melody is introduced by the first violin against a background of simple quarter notes in the lower registers of the other four instruments. The appearance of the second theme is like a welcome ray of sunlight. Schumann's rhythmic palette produces a magical feeling of stasis, as if time were standing still for a short, delicious time. It was at Felix Mendelssohn's urging that Schumann decided to throw away the A flat major section that originally served as the middle portion of this strange movement and replace it with the furious onslaught in F minor (agitato) that posterity has come to know. Perhaps the most striking moment in the movement is the remarkable, purposefully crass statement by the viola (on its C string) of the primary theme in the middle of the violent triplet activity. The movement is rounded off by a return of the initial march theme, now with a thudding pizzicato background that dies away into a quiet, otherworldly chord. - The Scherzo, molto vivace, makes a reprise of both the tonality and vivacious character of the first movement. Schumann chooses to use two separate trios in the movement, the first a lyrical canon, and the second a more robust section in A flat minor. - Some of Schumann's instrumental works conclude with movements that are but pale shadows of their brothers and sisters; not so with the Piano Quintet. From the opening attack in C minor (the percussiveness of which has caught many unwary listeners quite off guard) to the final glorious, contrapuntal conclusion, the composer imbues this finale with so piquant a mixture of verve, anxiety, and delicate lyricism that it must surely be considered the crowning glory of the entire work. The double fugue that serves as a coda to the finale. Taking as its one subject the principal theme of the first movement and as its other subject the principal theme of the last movement, it forms a noble and fitting conclusion. The piece is dedicated: "Clara Schumann geb. Wieck gewidmet".

Schumann: Ghost Variations, WoO 24 (Anderszewski, Levit)

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On the night of 17 February 1854, Schumann, suffering from severe aural hallucinations, claimed that he heard angels dictating a theme to him. If Clara Schumann’s diary entries are to be believed, Schumann immediately wrote down the theme, and on either 22 or 23 February started writing variations on it. (All that survives of this first draft is a single page of music, and so we cannot know if at this stage Schumann completed work on the variations, though is likely he had not). At 2 in the afternoon of 27 February Schumann tried to drown himself in the icy Rhine; he was rescued by bargemen who dragged him ashore. The next day he returned to these variations and (it seems) completed them. He sent the work to Clara, but by then she had already left to stay with a friend at the advice of a doctor. On 4 March Schumann voluntarily committed himself to an asylum in Endenich, where he would die just a little over 2 years later. The Geistervariationen (“Ghost Variations”) are Schumann’s last work. He did not seem to realise that the lovely chorale theme that he wrote down was one he had used several times before: in the 2nd mvt of his Violin Concerto in D min (in a fragmentary form), the 2nd mvt of his 2nd String Quartet, and the Lieder-Album für die Jugend (No.19, Frühlings Ankunft, with a different harmonic colour). Clara forbade the publication of the work (we don’t know why – possibly they were too personal, possibly she thought it was not musically up to par with Schumann’s earlier work), and it was only until 1939 that the work saw print, although Brahms wrote a set of 4-hand variations on Schumann’s theme in 1861. The Ghost Variations are, like most of Schumann's late work, extraordinarily intimate. All the variations cleave closely to the original theme, never quite departing its soundscape, and the original melody is always present. Rather than dissect the theme, the variations eavesdrop on it: Var. 1 adds triplet counterpoint in a middle voice; Var.2 unfolds as a touching canon; Var.3 opens the theme up just slightly by placing it in the LH and giving the RH gossamer-light triplet figuration; and Var.4 drains the theme of some of its warmth with intricate note placement, glacial and clear as ice. Var.5 represents something of a break from the earlier variations; it follows the harmony of the original theme exactly, but at first blush can be hard to recognise as related to the original theme. There is for the first time something disturbing here: both upper melody and middle-voice accompaniment are awash with chromatic grace notes, with the middle voice chromatic notes given to the LH in a way that just about suggests they have a separate life of their own. If emphasised, as Levit does (19:29), these LH nonharmonic notes create a gently dissonant haze in which the melody is nearly lost – kaleidoscopically beautiful and broken at the same time. Given what we know about the circumstances of this work’s composition, it is hard to be musically objective, but it seems that there is no more appropriate ending to a work that also bookended Schumann’s life. (We’re not even entirely certain if the work is complete – Schumann might have ended it where it did because he was unable to write more, and on purely intuitive grounds I'm inclined to believe this is the case.)

Schumann: Piano Works

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Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play): 🤍 More Information: 🤍 Social media: Brilliant Classics Facebook: 🤍 Brilliant Classics Instagram: 🤍 Spotify Playlists: Brilliant Classics Spotify: 🤍 New Classical Releases: 🤍 Classical Piano Music: 🤍 The Best of Liszt: 🤍 The Best of Bach: 🤍 Most Popular Piano Music: 🤍 Beautiful Classical Music: 🤍 Classical Music For Dinnertime: 🤍 Composer: Robert Schumann Artists: Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy (piano) A selection of piano works by Schumann, on SACD. The outstanding pianist Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy gives excellent performances of the Abegg Variations, The Intermezzi Op. 4 and the Symphonische Etuden Op. 13. Tracklist: 00:00:00 Robert Schumann: Abegg Variationen, Op. 1: Thema 00:01:01 Robert Schumann: Abegg Variationen, Op. 1: Variation 1 00:02:26 Robert Schumann: Abegg Variationen, Op. 1: Variation 2 00:03:30 Robert Schumann: Abegg Variationen, Op. 1: Variation 3 00:04:28 Robert Schumann: Abegg Variationen, Op. 1: Cantabile 00:05:40 Robert Schumann: Abegg Variationen, Op. 1: Finale alla Fantasia 00:08:12 Robert Schumann: Intermezzi, Op. 4: Allegro quasi maestoso 00:11:27 Robert Schumann: Intermezzi, Op. 4: Presto a capriccioso 00:15:35 Robert Schumann: Intermezzi, Op. 4: Allegro 00:19:23 Robert Schumann: Intermezzi, Op. 4: Allegretto semplice 00:21:20 Robert Schumann: Intermezzi, Op. 4: Allegro moderato 00:25:29 Robert Schumann: Intermezzi, Op. 4: Allegro 00:28:28 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Thema: andante 00:29:51 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude I: un poco piu vivo 00:31:02 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Anhang Variation 1 00:32:55 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude II: espressivo 00:35:56 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude III: Vivace 00:37:15 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude IV 00:38:11 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude V: scherzando 00:39:31 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Anhang Variation 4 00:42:58 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude VI: agitato 00:43:53 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude VII: allegro molto 00:45:07 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Anhang Variation 2 00:47:26 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Anhang Variation 5 00:50:56 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude VIII: sempre marcatissimo 00:53:30 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude IX: presto possibile 00:54:10 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Anhang Variation 3 00:55:36 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude X: con energia sempre 00:56:55 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude XI: con espressione 01:00:15 Robert Schumann: Symphonischen Etüden, Op. 13, including 5 posthumous variations: Etude XII: Finale, allegro brillante Thanks for watching! Feel free to subscribe and visit our channel for the best classical music from the greatest composers like: Bach, Satie, Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, Chopin, Haydn, Ravel, Debussy, Verdi, Vivaldi, Handel, Brahms, Liszt, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Rachmaninoff, Wagner, Strauss, Handel, Dvorak, Schubert and many more! We upload complete albums, music for relaxing, working, studying, meditating, concentrating, instrumental music, opera, violin, classical piano music, sonatas and more! #BrilliantClassics #Music #Composer #ClassicalMusic # RobertSchumann #WolframSchmitt-Leonardy #Piano # PianoWorks

Schumann: Kreisleriana, Op.16 (Slåttebrekk, Endres)

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Two wonderful and mystifyingly obscure performances of this masterwork. It’s hard to imagine a set of pieces that better represents Schumann’s style every imaginable Schuman-ism is here in abundance: accents on wrong beats, misplaced bar lines, muscular & jerkily taut fast sections, slow sections that are either rapt or sphinxlike, counterpoint of incredible expressiveness (Schumann studied the WTC very seriously, and his contrapuntal ability is too rarely acknowledged), drastically contrasting internal structures, pianistic textures that are never anything but original. The result is a collection of unbridled fierceness (all of the pieces, with one exception, are marked with performance instructions beginning with either “Very” or “Extremely”) and moving lyricism, and one of the real high points of miniature-set writing in all of classical music. Slåttebrekk’s performance represents playing of a high-voltage, live-wire sort (see the Noch schneller at 16:15 and so on). The fast movements are etched incredibly vividly: entrances are often shockingly intense, and dense textures are rendered almost jazzy. The slow sections are beguiling and butter-smooth. Endres has a more relaxed approach to the Kreisleriana, but brings out all sort of hidden detail: his application of rubato is generous but finely calculated, the tone warm and rich, and in the left hand in particular all sorts of gorgeous countermelodies appear (though with Endres it must be said that the handling of the counterpoint is uniformly spectacular.) No.1, Äußerst bewegt (Extremely animated): Begins as if in the middle of a phrase, with deceptive rhythms. ABA structure: two anguished sections flanking a lyrical middle one writing entirely in fleeting semiquavers. No.2, Sehr innig und nicht zu rasch (Very inwardly and not too quickly): ABACA form. The A section features supple, bell-like counterpoint. The first intermezzo is a rhythmically deceptive dance (you don’t quite hear the up-beat), and the second a blackly coiled thing that features imitative movement in the outer voices. The movement back into the A section features some inspired chromatic writing. No.3, Sehr aufgeregt (Very agitated): ABA form. The A section features dark, nervous figuration, and the B section is one of those flat-out heart-stoppingly gorgeous things that only Schumann could possibly have written. Counterpoint at its most expressive. No.4, Sehr langsam (Very slowly): Another ABA, with a surprising late-Beethoven-esque tenderness & sincerity to it. A bit like Der Dichter Spricht, from Kinderszenen. No.5, Sehr lebhaft (Very lively): ABACABA form, with wild swings of mood & texture. The A section features mischievous, spasm-like figuration (Chopin’s Bb min Scherzo springs to mind), and the way Schumann arranges the entry of the voices for dramatic effect betrays his skill as a contrapuntist. It’s also kind of fun to contrast how Slåttebrekk and Endres take the C section. The piece ends almost as an afterthought. No.6, Sehr langsam (Very slowly): Often identified as the “heart” of the Kreisleriana, and for good reason. A(B)ACA form. An extraordinarily simple melody grows agitated, and abrupt scalar runs suddenly appear before fading back into the original melody. The rhythmic motif of the melody is then reeled out into highly suggestive new material, which before it can fully blossom recedes again into the opening melody. No.7, Sehr rasch (Very fast): A surprisingly Baroque thing, if certainly more schizoid and unrestrained than anything from that period. ABAC form, with the A section featuring false resolutions on diminished 7th chords and a section with intense sequential movement around the circle of 5ths. The B section is distinctly fuguelike, and right after the A section returns at an even higher speed, the music screeches to a halt in the C section, which features a sweet, simple theme. Typical Schumann, really. No.8, Schnell und spielend (Fast and playful): ABACA form. The A section sees the RH tiptoeting up and down the keyboard in a rather false-moustache-and-eyeglass way, while the LH tries and fails to synchronize with it. The B section could be described as richly lyrical, if not for the fact that the A section rhythm never quite lets up. The C section injects a burst of profound tragedy that gradually grows into something more warm, even heroic (Schumann indicates Mit aller Kraft, “with all your power”). Slåttebrekk: 00:00 – No.1* 02:41 – No.2 12:14 – No.3* 16:48 – No.4 20:57 – No.5* 23:53 – No.6 28:13 – No.7 30:25 – No.8 Endres: 33:34 – No.1 36:24 – No.2* 45:35 – No.3 49:59 – No.4 54:08 – No.5 57:28 – No.6 1:02:03 – No.7* 1:04:12 – No.8*

Sviatoslav Richter - Schumann - Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op 82

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05.05.2013

Support us on Patreon and get more content: 🤍 - Robert Schumann Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op 82 1 Eintritt 2 Jäger auf der Lauer 3 Einsame Blumen 4 Verrufene Stelle 5 Freundliche Landschaft 6 Herberge 7 Vogel als Prophet 8 Jagdlied 9 Abschied Sviatoslav Richter, piano Recorded live, 1956

7.83 Hz Schumann Resonance, 432 Hz Powerful Healing Frequency, Boost Positive Energy, Meditation

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Schumann resonances are electromagnetic resonances of our planet. They can be found in the space between the earth's surface and the ionosphere. They are very low frequencies, the lowest is 7.83 Hz. This frequency belongs to the Theta waves. This track can be of great help for deep meditation and lucid dreaming. We have used binaural and isochronic tone patterns. You can listen to this composition with or without headphones or earphones. Namaste Activate notifications so you can stay up to date on the latest news. We publish on Monday and Wednesday. ℗ 2022 Music for Body and Spirit – Meditation Music All rights reserved. Music for Body and Spirit channel includes also: Meditation music For your short and long meditation or yoga sessions, to balance your body and spirit. Here you can find the music suitable for your taste. Healing Frequencies Music Frequencies of these tracks have been chosen for a specific situation like sleep or anxiety problems, or to accompany meditations. We underline that these tracks cannot cure a health condition nor do they want to replace the advice of a doctor or health care provider. Moreover, never listen to our music whilst driving or operating machinery of any kind. Binaural Beats Brain waves for intelligence, happiness, sleep and meditation. Chakra Meditation Music This playlist can improve the balance of your key chakras and bring your health and mental attitude into a more peaceful state. Relaxing Music These tracks can be used in any situation: as a background while you are working, in relaxation moments after a stressful day or just when you like. Guided Meditation Let a pleasant voice guide you into deep relaxation. Reiki Music Here you can find the music for your Reiki treatments with bell every 3 minutes, or without bell. Tracks with bell change to every position with melodies and harmonies studied in detail to help the treatment. Sleep music Sleep is very important to a person's health. These compositions are designed to accompany you for the duration of your sleep or just to fall asleep. WE UNDERLINE THAT OUR MUSIC CANNOT CURE A HEALTH CONDITION NOR DOES IT WANT TO REPLACE THE ADVICE OF A DOCTOR OR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER. MOREOVER, NEVER LISTEN TO OUR MUSIC WHILST DRIVING OR OPERATING MACHINERY OF ANY KIND. ℗ 2014 - 2022 Music for Body and Spirit – Meditation Music All rights reserved. Buy our music: Amazon: 🤍 iTunes: 🤍 7 Digital: 🤍 Streaming music: Spotify: 🤍 Deezer: 🤍 YouTube Music: 🤍 Napster: 🤍 Tidal: 🤍 Find us with the name “Music Body and Spirit” ℗ 2014 - 2022 Music Body and Spirit All rights reserved. Our site: 🤍 Follow Music for Body and Spirit social pages: Facebook: 🤍 Instagram: 🤍 Twitter: 🤍 TikTok: 🤍 Pinterest: 🤍 For business enquiries: info🤍musicforbodyandspirit.com #meditation #schumannresonance #7.83hz

Schumann: Complete Piano Trios, Complete String Quartets, Fantasiestücke Op.88

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19.08.2018

Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play): 🤍 More Information: 🤍 Brilliant Classics Spotify: 🤍 Brilliant Classics Facebook: 🤍 Composer: Robert Schumann Artist: Quartetto Savinio Matteo Fossi (piano) Schumann composed his three string quartets and the Fantasiestücke Op.88 in his ‘chamber music year’ of 1842, while preparing for the two oratorios which he regarded as his greatest work in any medium, Paradise and the Peri (1843) and the Scenes from Goethe’s Faust, which preoccupied him on and off for the next decade. Posterity has however been less kind to these large-scale summations than the song cycles and chamber works, such as those recorded here, in which the composer’s obsessive reworking of small motifs finds consistently impassioned expression. As befits their place within the canon of the genre, the string quartets are often densely and contrapuntally worked, whereas the piano-trio Fantasiestücke are more characteristic of Schumann the lyric poet, whether for voice or instruments. These four pieces are cast as a sonata manqué, with a soulful prelude, lively Scherzo, yearning duet for the two string instruments and combative finale. They have not received the attention they deserve from either performers or listeners, but they are fully the equal of the three piano trios proper in which, according to Alfred Einstein, can best be heard the composer’s self-declared dual nature as both Florestan and Eusebius, impetuous man of action and melancholy dreamer. Joy and exuberance are their keynotes. Tracklist: 00:00:00 String Quartet No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 41: I. Introduzione. Andante espressivo – Allegro 00:09:11 String Quartet No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 41: II. Scherzo. Presto 00:13:01 String Quartet No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 41: III. Adagio 00:18:37 String Quartet No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 41: IV. Presto 00:25:06 String Quartet No. 3 in A Major, Op. 41: I. Andante espressivo – Allegro molto moderato 00:32:43 String Quartet No. 3 in A Major, Op. 41: II. Assai agitato 00:39:12 String Quartet No. 3 in A Major, Op. 41: III. Adagio molto 00:47:08 String Quartet No. 3 in A Major, Op. 41: IV. Finale. Allegro molto vivace 00:54:00 String Quartet No. 2 in F Major, Op. 41: I. Allegro vivace 00:59:46 String Quartet No. 2 in F Major, Op. 41: II. Andante, quasi variazioni 01:07:28 String Quartet No. 2 in F Major, Op. 41: III. Scherzo. Presto 01:10:44 String Quartet No. 2 in F Major, Op. 41: IV. Allegro molto vivace 01:17:51 Piano Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80: I. Sehr Lebhaft 01:25:24 Piano Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80: II. Mit innigem Ausdruck 01:32:42 Piano Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80: III. In mässiger Bewegung 01:38:03 Piano Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80: IV. Nicht zu rasch 01:43:39 Fantasiestücke in A Minor, Op.88: I. Romanze. Nicht schnell, mit innigem Ausdruck 01:45:57 Fantasiestücke in A Minor, Op.88: II. Humoreske. Lebhaft 01:52:52 Fantasiestücke in A Minor, Op.88: III. Duett. Langsam und mit Ausdruck 01:56:03 Fantasiestücke in A Minor, Op.88: IV. Finale. In Marsch-Tempo 02:01:58 Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 63: I. Mit Energie und Leidenschaft 02:14:00 Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 63: II. Lebhaft, doch nicht zu rasch 02:18:44 Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 63: III. Langsam, mit inniger Empfindung 02:23:49 Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 63: IV. Mit Feuer 02:31:43 Piano Trio No. 3 in G Minor, Op. 110: I. Bewegt, doch nicht zu rasch 02:41:06 Piano Trio No. 3 in G Minor, Op. 110: II. Ziemlich langsam – Etwas bewegter – Schneller – Erstes Tempo 02:46:43 Piano Trio No. 3 in G Minor, Op. 110: III. Rasch 02:50:51 Piano Trio No. 3 in G Minor, Op. 110: IV. Kräftig, mit Humor

Schumann: Cello Transcriptions

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01:55:30
01.08.2018

Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play): 🤍 More Information: 🤍 Brilliant Classics Spotify: 🤍 Brilliant Classics Facebook: 🤍 Composers: Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Grützmacher, Robert Schumann Artists: Francesco Dillon (cello), Emanuele Torquati (piano) Schumann and the cello: we may think of the fine, late and rhapsodic Cello Concerto, or the lighter Stücke im Volkston, much beloved of cello students this past century and a half. But here is something different: songs, piano works – including the complete Kinderszenen cycle – and the Second Violin Sonata, all arranged for cello and piano. The arrangements were made by Friedrich Grützmacher, that indefatigable populariser of the cello in mid-19th-century Germany and tireless appropriater and editor of other men’s music for the cello at a time when his instrument had to get by on precious few original pieces – the Vivaldi concertos, for example, were still stuck in Venetian libraries and would stay there for another century. But Grützmacher edited the Bach Cello Suites, the Haydn Concertos and pieces by Boccherini, to make them better known, and indeed to adapt them to 19th-century ways of doing things. He it was, also who gave the first performance of the Stücke im Volkston. No such problems of era exist with these Schumann arrangements, which vary from comparatively straight transcription (in the case of the Second Violin Sonata) to thoroughgoing and imaginative realisation, in the case of Kinderszenen. Grützmacher shows that these pieces may happily belong to the cello, and even gain a certain mellow charm thereby, especially when played, as they are here, by a young performer of ardent and thoughtful sympathy. 00:00:00 Lieder, Widmung, Op. 25: No. 1 00:02:12 Lieder, Du bist wie eine Blume, Op. 25: No. 1 00:03:46 Lieder, Er der Herrlichsten von Allen, Op. 42: No. 2 00:06:40 Lieder, Dein Angesicht, Op 127: No. 2 00:08:41 Lieder, Der Nussbaum, Op. 25: No. 3 00:11:02 Lieder, Mondnacht, Op. 39: No. 5 00:14:15 Lieder, Fruehlingsnacht, Op. 39: No. 12 00:16:49 Lieder, Die Stille, Op. 39: No. 4 00:18:27 Lieder, Wanderlied, Op. 35: No. 3 00:21:05 Lieder, Die Lotosblume, Op. 25: No. 7 00:22:49 Lieder, An den Sonnenschein 00:24:28 Lieder, Waldesgespraech, Op. 39: No. 3 00:27:35 Lieder, Ich grolle nicht, Op 48: No. 7 00:29:07 Lieder, Romanze, Op. 138: No. 5 00:31:51 Lieder, Sonntags am Rhein, Op. 36: No. 1 00:33:55 Lieder, Volksliedchen, Op. 51: No. 2 00:35:03 Lieder, Die beiden Grenadiere, Op. 49: No. 1 00:38:28 Piano Works, Abendlied, Op. 85 00:41:42 Piano Works, Alpenfee, Op. 115 00:43:54 Piano Works, Romanze, Op. 28 00:47:35 Piano Works, Schlummerlied, Op. 124 00:50:37 Piano Works, Warum, Op. 12 00:53:13 Piano Works, Froehlicher Landmann und Soldatenmarsch, Op. 68 00:56:44 Piano Works, Abschied, Op 82 00:59:33 Piano Works, Am Springbrunnen, Op. 85 01:02:57 Violin Sonata No. 2 in D, Op. 121: I. Ziemlich Langsam - Lebhaft 01:16:29 Violin Sonata No. 2 in D, Op. 121: II. Sehr lebhaft 01:21:26 Violin Sonata No. 2 in D, Op. 121: III. Leise, einfach 01:27:31 Violin Sonata No. 2 in D, Op. 121: IV. Bewegt 01:36:51 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Von fremden Laendern und Menschen 01:38:34 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Curiose Geschichte 01:39:43 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Hasche-Mann 01:40:18 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Bittendes Kind 01:41:00 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Glueckes genug 01:41:34 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Wichtige Begebenheit 01:42:31 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Traeumerei 01:45:08 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Am Camin 01:46:12 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Ritter vom Steckenpferd 01:46:56 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Fast zu ernst 01:49:20 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Fuerchtenmachen 01:50:50 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Kind im Einschlummern 01:53:14 Kinderszenen, Op. 15: Der Dichter spricht

Schumann: Fantasiestücke, op.73 - Olivier Patey & Martijn Willers - Live concert HD

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00:10:33
08.01.2021

Olivier Patey en Martijn Willers spelen Fantasiestücke, op.73 van Schumann op maandag 28 december 2020 tijdens het Internationaal Kamermuziek Festival Utrecht 2020. Het muzikale programma: Robert Schumann - Fantasiestücke, op.73 De uitvoerenden: Olivier Patey, klarinet Martijn Willers, piano Opname: Middagconcert Internationaal Kamermuziek Festival 2020 op maandag 28 december 2020 in TivoliVredenburg te Utrecht. Meer AVROTROS Klassiek: ♬ Facebook: 🤍 ♬ Twitter: 🤍 ♬ Instagram: 🤍 ————————————— International Chamber Music Festival is a yearly celebration of world-class chamber music in the heart of the Netherlands. Music aficionados from all over the Netherlands flock to Utrecht to listen and see some of the world's most distinguished classical music performers in action in unique and charming venues all across Utrecht. On the musical program: Robert Schumann - Fantasiestücke, op.73 The musicians: Olivier Patey, clarinet Martijn Willers, piano Recording: International Chamber Music Festival 2020 of Monday the 28th of December 2020, in TivoliVredenburg in Utrecht, The Netherlands. More AVROTROS Klassiek: ♬ Facebook: 🤍 ♬ Twitter: 🤍 ♬ Instagram: 🤍

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